March 13. Action 13. Understanding and addressing specific needs of LGBTQ2S and non-binary folks

Abuse occurs within lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, queer, trans, non-binary, and straight relationships. It happens in all communities regardless of race, social status or education. Size, strength, mental health, use of substances, gender presentation or politics does not determine whether a person has been abused or is abusive.

Unfortunately, because most research on domestic and sexual abuse focuses on heterosexual experiences of violence, LGBTQ2S and non-binary folks are excluded from initiatives to end intimate partner violence.

Experiences of intimate partner violence becomes even more complex when we consider how sexual orientation or gender identity intersects with other aspects of identity (e.g. race/ethnicity), which then interact with systems of oppression (e.g. heterosexism, racism).[1]

An intersectional approach is needed to listen to diverse voices and eliminate barriers that LGBTQ2S and non-binary folks face to access community services, justice, health care, support for survivors of violence – barriers such as non-inclusive language in outreach materials, exclusion of programs and services due to gender identity, unsafe practices like survivors and abusive partners in the same program, harassment, homo/bi/transphobia.

BWSS recognizes that LGBTQ2S and non-binary folks experience domestic and sexual violence and we are committed to facing this reality and providing relevant services and support for lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, queer, transgender, two-spirit, and non-binary survivors of violence. To learn more, we have some resources for you online:

LGBTQ2S Power and Control Wheel

BEYOND THE WHEEL: Tactics of Abuse

Trans-misogyny primer by Julia Serano

It takes a village, people! Advocacy for friends, family, and LGBT survivors of abuse

Proceed! LGBTQ Domestic Violence Legal Toolkit for Advocates

Trans-Specific Power and Control Tactics

Still Hidden in the Closet

Trans Women and Domestic Violence by Kae Greenberg

Break the Cycle

Transgender Youth and dating violence

There’s no one I can trust

The impact of mandatory reporting on the help-seeking and wellbeing of domestic violence survivors

[1] Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) in Rainbow Communities, 2015. Centre for Research & Education on Violence Against Women and Children. Retrieved from http://www.vawlearningnetwork.ca/our-work/issuebased_newsletters/issue-12/12-Rainbow_Newsletter_Print_InHouse.pdf

 

[1] Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) in Rainbow Communities, 2015. Centre for Research & Education on Violence Against Women and Children. Retrieved from http://www.vawlearningnetwork.ca/our-work/issuebased_newsletters/issue-12/12-Rainbow_Newsletter_Print_InHouse.pdf